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Mister.Weirdo's Memorial Thread For Those Who Will NOT Be Down For Breakfast

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  • Shut up and quit harassing the young people, old man! Get back to groping your caregiver!

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    • http://www.sandiegoreader.com/weblog...eborah-raffin/

      If the name fails to ring a bell it's either because you aren't old enough to have gone to the movies in the '70s, or you weren't born in China.

      Deborah Raffin, the American actress with archetypal girl next door good looks, died Wednesday at the Ronald Regan UCLA Medical Center. Raffin, 59, was diagnosed with Leukemia about a year ago.

      Raffin began her big screen career with a pair of unremarkable genre pictures. She assumed the "other woman" role opposite Liv Ullmann and Edward Albert in the May/December romcom, 40 Carats. The Ingmar Bergman connection continued with The Dove, a true-life sailing drama photographed by Sven Nykvist.

      Three of her films have taken up permanent home in my video collection. Jacqueline Susann's Once is Not Enough is a veritable scream fest with Kirk Douglas' brow and jaw working overtime to prevent his spiteful daughter from banging everyone in Tinsel Town. Scripted by Julius Epstein (The Strawberry Blonde, Casablanca), it's a disastrous attempt to meld old Hollywood style with what once passed for modern thinking.

      It was death-by-association when Raffin signed on to play Charles Bronson's love interest in the sublimely scuzzy Death Wish III. No woman who assumed the role ever lived to see the final cue mark.

      Larry Cohen's God Told Me To is the one legitimate masterwork in the Raffin canon. It's a deeply unsettling horror film and one of the first since Fritz Lang's The Testament of Dr. Mabuse or Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt to openly explore the sick psyche of a serial killer.

      Everything that follows DW3 is either made-for-TV, unwatchable, or both. She could have been Hollywood's next big thing were it not for one fatal character flaw: she refused to doff her clothes off for the camera.

      Nightmare in Badham County, a 1976 small screen release, became a huge theatrical hit in mainland China. Raffin's popularity was such that she became the first Western actress ever to make a movie promotional tour of the city.

      She earned the distinction of being nominated for both a Golden Globe and Razzie Award for her performance in Touched by Love (1981).

      A books-on-tape business she ventured into in the '80's turned out to be a multimillion-dollar success. Raffin is survived by her two siblings, William and Judy Holston; and a daughter, Taylor Rose Viner.
      Mister.Weirdo
      Guardian of the Universe
      Last edited by Mister.Weirdo; 11-24-2012, 05:51 AM.

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      • Yo.

        Originally posted by fearless2814.1 View Post
        Shut up and quit harassing the young people, old man! Get back to groping your caregiver!
        ok, look here ya young whippersnapper: U stop gettin' in the way of me fun, or else theres no blackjack OR hookers fer ya!!

        now go get me another blanket fer mah legs cuz its a mite drafty up'n heah, and its tellin' the arthur-ritis in mah knees to start itchin' something fierce........AND WHERES THAT NURSE DAD-GUMMIT?!??


        Originally posted by Mister.Weirdo View Post
        http://www.sandiegoreader.com/weblog...eborah-raffin/

        -------

        Not so much of a slacker now am I, Tazer?
        posting about a death I left notice about some 15hrs previous kinda keeps ya in the slacker category CHUM.




        Tazer


        Originally posted by Andrew NDB
        Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

        Comment


        • Larry hagman died today.


          This is someone we've actually heard of.


          Slackers.

          Comment


          • I know Larry Hagman just died, I was just about to post a link to an article about his death.

            http://tvline.com/2012/11/23/larry-h...ead-at-age-81/

            Comment


            • Yo.

              U mean someone YOU'VE actually heard of....and besides, news of Hangmans being wormfood hasnt been out for that long (and I dont watch the evening news so....)

              nag.




              Tazer


              Originally posted by Andrew NDB
              Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Tazer View Post
                Yo.

                U mean someone YOU'VE actually heard of....and besides, news of Hangmans being wormfood hasnt been out for that long (and I dont watch the evening news so....)

                nag.




                Tazer

                Well if I was really a slacker like you claim, I wouldn't have posted a link relating to his death until hours after the news had been broken.

                Comment


                • Get your link ready for hector Camacho, its only a matter of time.

                  Comment


                  • Well he's not dead yet, so I think your good for tonight.

                    Comment


                    • Yo.

                      Originally posted by Mister.Weirdo View Post
                      Well if I was really a slacker like you claim, I wouldn't have posted a link relating to his death until hours after the news had been broken.
                      that post was meant for Rob, not U MW......




                      Tazer


                      Originally posted by Andrew NDB
                      Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Tazer View Post
                        Yo.

                        U mean someone YOU'VE actually heard of....and besides, news of Hangmans being wormfood hasnt been out for that long (and I dont watch the evening news so....)

                        nag.




                        Tazer
                        So you had never heard of hagman?

                        Comment


                        • http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/1...n_2184184.html

                          Hector "Macho" Camacho, a Puerto Rican boxer known for skill and flamboyance in the ring as well as for a messy personal life and run-ins with the police, was declared dead on Saturday, four days after being shot in the face. He was 50.

                          Shot while sitting in a parked car outside a bar Tuesday with a friend in the city of Bayamon, he was declared dead at the Centro Medico trauma center in San Juan. The friend, 49-year-old Adrian Mojica Moreno, died at the scene of the shooting. Police said Mojica had nine small bags of cocaine in his pocket and a 10th bag was found open in the car.

                          Originally from Bayamon, just outside San Juan, Camacho was long regarded as a flashy if volatile talent, a skilled boxer who was perhaps overshadowed by his longtime foil, Mexican superstar Julio Cesar Chavez, who would beat him in a long-awaited showdown in Las Vegas in 1992.

                          Camacho fought professionally for three decades, from his humble debut against David Brown at New York's Felt Forum in 1980 to an equally forgettable swansong against Sal Duran in Kissimmee, Florida, in 2010.

                          In between, he fought some of the biggest stars spanning two eras, including Sugar Ray Leonard, Felix Trinidad, Oscar De La Hoya and Roberto Duran.

                          "This is something I've done all my life, you know?" Camacho told The Associated Press after a workout in 2010. "A couple years back, when I was doing it, I was still enjoying it. The competition, to see myself perform. I know I'm at the age that some people can't do this no more."

                          Camacho's family moved to New York when he was young and he grew up in Spanish Harlem, which at the time was rife with crime. Camacho landed in jail as a teenager before turning to boxing, which for many kids in his neighborhood provided an outlet for their aggression.

                          Former featherweight champion Juan Laporte, a friend since childhood, described Camacho as "like a little brother who was always getting into trouble," but otherwise combined a friendly nature with a powerful jab.

                          "He's a good human being, a good hearted person," Laporte said as he waited with other friends and members of the boxer's family outside the hospital in San Juan after the shooting. "A lot of people think of him as a cocky person but that was his motto ... inside he was just a kid looking for something."

                          Laporte lamented that Camacho never found a mentor outside the boxing ring.

                          "The people around him didn't have the guts or strength to lead him in the right direction," Laporte said. "There was no one strong enough to put a hand on his shoulder and tell him how to do it."

                          Drug, alcohol and other problems trailed Camacho after the prime of his boxing career. He was sentenced in 2007 to seven years in prison for the burglary of a computer store in Mississippi. While arresting him on the burglary charge in January 2005, police also found the drug ecstasy.

                          A judge eventually suspended all but one year of the sentence and gave Camacho probation. He wound up serving two weeks in jail, though, after violating that probation.

                          Camacho's former wife, Amy, obtained a restraining order against him in 1998, alleging he threatened her and one of their children. The couple, who had two children at the time, later divorced.

                          He divided his time between Puerto Rico and Florida in recent years, appearing on Spanish-language television as well as on a reality show called "Es Macho Time!" on YouTube.

                          Inside the boxing ring, Camacho flourished. He won three Golden Gloves titles as an amateur, and after turning pro, he quickly became a contender with an all-action style reminiscent of other Puerto Rican fighters.

                          Long promoted by Don King, Camacho won his first world title by beating Rafael Limon in a super-featherweight bout in Puerto Rico on Aug. 7, 1983. He moved up in weight two years later to capture a lightweight title by defeating Jose Luis Ramirez, and successfully defended the belt against fellow countryman Edwin Rosario.

                          The Rosario fight, in which the victorious Camacho still took a savage beating, persuaded him to scale back his ultra-aggressive style in favor of a more cerebral, defensive approach.

                          The change in style was a big reason that Camacho, at the time 38-0, lost a close split decision to Greg Haugen at Caesar's Palace in Las Vegas in 1991.

                          Camacho won the rematch to set up his signature fight against Chavez, this time at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas. Camacho was roundly criticized for his lack of action, and the Mexican champion won a lopsided unanimous decision to retain the lightweight title.

                          It was at that point that Camacho became the name opponent for other rising contenders, rather than the headliner fighting for his own glory.

                          He lost a unanimous decision to another young Puerto Rican fighter, Trinidad, and was soundly defeated by De La Hoya. In 1997, Camacho ended Leonard's final comeback with a fifth-round knockout. It was Camacho's last big victory even though he boxed for another decade.

                          "Hector was a fighter who brought a lot of excitement to boxing," said Ed Brophy, executive director of International the Boxing Hall of Fame. "He was a good champion. Roberto Duran is kind of in a class of his own, but Hector surely was an exciting fighter that gave his all to the sport."

                          The fighter's last title bout came in 1997 against welterweight champion Oscar De La Hoya, who won by unanimous decision. Camacho's last fight was his defeat by Duran in May 2010. He had a career record of 79-6-3.

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                          • Yo.

                            Originally posted by Robinson View Post
                            So you had never heard of hagman?
                            I have, but :1) Im sure theres a quite a few here who havent, and more accurately I meant 2) that YOU hadnt heard of Deborah Raffin.




                            Tazer


                            Originally posted by Andrew NDB
                            Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

                            Comment


                            • I wonder how Hagman's death will effect the new Dallas series...

                              Comment


                              • http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...an-dies-393900

                                Dinah Sheridan, who starred in the quintessential British classics The Railway Children and Genevieve, died Sunday at her home in Northwood, Middlesex, England. She was 92.

                                In The Railway Children (1970), the elegant Sheridan starred as Mrs. Waterbury, a mother who is forced to move with her three children from the suburbs to a home near a train station after her husband is falsely imprisoned. The film is based on the classic children's novel by E. Nesbit.

                                In the light-hearted Genevieve (1953), Sheridan played the wife of one of two friends (John Gregson and Kenneth More) who face off in an increasingly competitive antique car rally. The comedy won the BAFTA for best British film of the year.

                                Sheridan also starred as Angela Latimer in the British sitcom Don't Wait Up, which ran six seasons until 1990. In 1983, she appeared in The Five Doctors, a feature-length episode of Doctor Who.

                                She was born Dinah Mec in London on Sept. 17, 1920, to a Russian father and German mother who were photographers to the royal family. The gray-eyed blonde made her stage debut at age 12 and later toured as Wendy in Peter Pan opposite Charles Laughton as Captain Hook and Elsa Lanchester in the title role.

                                Sheridan, who picked her last name out of a telephone book, played the detective's wife Steve in the Paul Temple films Calling Paul Temple (1948) and Paul Temple's Triumph (1950). She gave up her movie career during World War II to drive an ambulance.

                                Her resume also includes Irish and Proud of It (1938), Salute John Citizen (1942), The Huggetts Abroad (1949), Dark Secret (1949), Where No Vultures Fly (1951), director David Lean's Breaking the Sound Barrier (1952), The Story of Gilbert and Sullivan (1953), Appointment in London (1953) and The Mirror Crack’d (1980), with Angela Lansbury.

                                Sheridan's survivors include actress Jenny Hanley, best known as a presenter on the ITV children's show Magpie, and politician Jeremy Hanley, once a member of Parliament.

                                Sheridan was married four times: to actor Jimmy Hanley; to John Davis, then president of the British entertainment conglomerate the Rank Organisation, who insisted she give up her acting career (her return to the movies was The Railway Children); to actor John Merivale; and to California advertising executive Aubrey Ison.

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