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Mister.Weirdo's Memorial Thread For Those Who Will NOT Be Down For Breakfast

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  • http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/1...n_2380730.html

    Harry Carey Jr., a character actor who starred in such Westerns as "3 Godfathers" and "Wagon Master," has died. He was 91.

    His daughter, Melinda Carey, said he died Thursday of natural causes surrounded by family at a hospice facility in Santa Barbara, Calif.

    "He went out as gracefully as he came in," she said Friday.

    Carey's career spanned more than 50 years and included such John Ford classics as "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon," "The Searchers" and "The Long Gray Line." Later in life, he appeared in the movies "Gremlins" and "Back to the Future Part III."

    His memoir, "Company of Heroes: My Life as an Actor in the John Ford Stock Company," was published in 1994.

    While he lacked the leading-man stature of longtime friend and co-star John Wayne, Carey's boyish looks and horse-riding skills earned him roles in many of Ford's films.

    He and fellow character Ben Johnson famously learned to stand simultaneously on two galloping horses – a trick known as roman riding – for the 1950 film "Rio Grande" starring Wayne.

    "My journey has been that of a character actor," he wrote in his memoir. "I've worked with the great and the not-so-great. But mostly I've worked with men and women who loved their profession, and who like me, had kids to raise and houses to pay for."

    Carey was the son of silent-film Western star Harry Carey Sr. and actress Olive Carey. He was born on May 16, 1921, on his family's ranch and graduated from Hollywood's Black-Foxe Military Institute.

    During World War II, he served in the Navy and worked with Ford on films for the Navy.

    He is survived by his wife, a son, two daughters, three grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

    Comment


    • Yo.

      him in Gremlins:



      him in She Wore A Yellow Ribbon:





      Tazer


      Originally posted by Andrew NDB
      Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

      Comment


      • http://www.thewrap.com/movies/column...accident-70976

        Mike Hopkins, the Oscar-winning sound editor behind "King Kong" and "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy, died in a drowning accident in New Zealand on Sunday. He was 53.

        Hopkins was rafting with friends through the Tararua Range on New Zealand's North Island when the raft capsized, throwing him into the Waiohine River, according to the Australian.

        Hopkins was wearing a wetsuit, lifejacket and a helmet, but the river's fast flow dragged him under, police told the newspaper.

        The sound editor shared an Oscar with Ethan Van der Ryn for best achievement in sound editing for "King Kong" in 2006. Before that, the duo won the Oscar for best sound editing on the second installment in Peter Jackson's "Lord of the Rings" trilogy, "The Two Towers."

        In 2007, he was also nominated for his work on the first film of the "Transformers" franchise.

        Hopkins was also nominated for five British Academy of Film and Television Arts awards, and worked on such films as "Kung Fu Panda," "Dreamgirls" and "Valkyrie."

        Comment


        • Yo.






          Tazer


          Originally posted by Andrew NDB
          Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

          Comment


          • Damn. It's sad to hear about the passing of ANY King Kong or LOTR allumni. Especially an untimely death. Those two franchises are very near and dear to my heart.

            Comment


            • Yo.

              http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/03/ar...t-85.html?_r=0

              Patti Page, Honey-Voiced 50s Pop Sensation, Dies at 85




              Tazer


              Originally posted by Andrew NDB
              Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

              Comment


              • Yo.

                .........so, Im guessing my post didnt suffice somehow?!??




                Tazer


                Originally posted by Andrew NDB
                Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

                Comment


                • http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplayli...-2013-20130107

                  Hey may not have been nominated for any Oscars, but stuntman turned filmmaker David R. Ellis had more modest goals. His filmography suggests a director that was aiming for mainstream kudos despite what the critical world might have to say, but unfortunately, his career behind the camera was cut short. He has unexpectedly passed away at the age of 60.
                  Best known for meme-generating "Snakes On A Plane," and two entries in the "Final Destination" franchise, Ellis made his debut as an actor, with a small role in the 1975 movie "The Strongest Man In The World" starring Kurt Russell. But he soon moved into performing as a stuntman and serving as a stunt coordinator, logging credits in a diverse array of films including "Scarface," "To Live And Die In L.A.," "Fatal Attraction," "Patriot Games" and more. He also cut his teeth as a filmmaker as a second unit director, serving that function on "Harry Potter And The Philosopher's Stone," "Deep Blue Sea," "Waterworld" and the upcoming "Winter's Tale" with Colin Farrell, Will Smith, Jennifer Connelly and Russell Crowe.

                  Following last year's "Shark Night 3D," Ellis was currently in Johannesburg, South Africa prepping the live-action adaptation of the anime "Kite," which would find him reteaming with 'Snakes' and 'Sea' star Samuel L. Jackson. No cause of death has been given. Our thoughts are with his family, friends and colleagues.
                  Mister.Weirdo
                  Guardian of the Universe
                  Last edited by Mister.Weirdo; 01-16-2013, 08:04 PM.

                  Comment


                  • Yo.






                    Tazer


                    Originally posted by Andrew NDB
                    Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

                    Comment


                    • http://insidemovies.ew.com/2013/01/1...a-melato-died/

                      Italian actress Mariangela Melato, known for her critically acclaimed performance as a spoiled socialite stranded with a sailor she had tormented in the 1974 film comedy Swept Away, has died in a Rome hospital at age 71.

                      The Antea hospital said she died Friday. The LaPresse news agency said she was suffering from pancreatic cancer.

                      The blond actress had most success in a series of films in the 1970s directed by Italian Lina Wertmuller,
                      including The Seduction of Mimi and Love and Anarchy.

                      One of the most acclaimed was the role of a socialite who finds herself stranded with Giancarlo Giannini. Her role was played by Madonna in a 2002 remake.

                      Melato had less success in Hollywood roles, which included a supporting part in Flash Gordon in 1980.

                      Comment


                      • Yo.

                        I remember seeing that rich-PITA-stuck-on-island-with-fisherman -movie many, many MANY moons ago late-nite on PBS:




                        ..........but Im sure much more of us will remember her from *this* particular role:



                        "Dispatch war-rocket Ajax to bring back his body" indeed............







                        Tazer


                        Originally posted by Andrew NDB
                        Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

                        Comment


                        • http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/0...n_2478792.html

                          TOKYO — Nagisa Oshima, a Japanese director internationally acclaimed for his films "Empire of Passion" and "In the Realm of the Senses," has died of pneumonia. He was 80.

                          His office, Oshima Productions, said Oshima died Tuesday afternoon at a hospital near Tokyo after being in and out of hospital since he was struck by a stroke more than a decade ago.

                          A former student radical from Japan's ancient capital of Kyoto, Oshima debuted in 1959 with "A Town of Love and Hope," quickly earning a reputation of a "new wave" director with social and political themes during the 1960, often depicting youths raging against the society. He tackled controversial social issues throughout his career, ranging from capital punishment and racism to homosexuality.

                          But he is probably best remembered for his 1976 film "In the Realm of the Senses," a story based on a psychotic murder case set in pre-World War II Japan, which stirred public indecency debate in Japan and elsewhere because of explicit sex scenes. Two years later, Oshima won best director award at the Cannes International Film Festival with "Empire of Passion."

                          In 1961, Oshima directed "The Catch," based on Nobel laureate Kenzaburo Oe's novel about an African-American soldier who was captured in a wartime Japanese village. His 1968 film "Death By Hanging" was his criticism against capital punishment and racism.

                          His 1983 film "Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence," a drama of war prisoners' camp starring David Bowie, comedian-director Takeshi Kitano and composer Ryuichi Sakamoto, was also a major international hit.

                          Despite suffering a stroke in 1996, Oshima briefly returned to filmmaking in 1999 with "Taboo," a story of gay samurais set at the end of the Edo period, which became his last work.

                          Oshima also was a popular guest on television quiz and talk shows, often triggering fiery debate. Soichiro Tahara, a journalist and talk show host who often argued with Oshima, tweeted his message of condolence.

                          "I was scared of him but he was also like a very supportive brother. He taught me many things, scolded me and yelled at me. But his words were always affectionate," Tahara wrote. "Mr. Oshima did not care about taboo or compliance, not even a bit. He said what he wanted to say, what he had to say. It's hard to find a person like him anymore. "

                          Comment


                          • http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Hollywo...-finch-dead-71

                            Actor Jon Finch, known to movie goers for his performances in films like "Frenzy" and "The Tragedy of Macbeth," is dead at the age of 71. His body was discovered in his home in Hastings "after friends and family became concerned for his welfare," according to The Telegraph.

                            Finch's career might have taken a dramatic turn had he accepted one of the biggest roles in Hollywood then - and now. James Bond.

                            The actor was offered the spy franchise back in the early 1970s, but after turning it down Roger Moore stepped in nicely to both star in "Live and Let Die" and take over the lucrative movie series. Fame and fortune weren't atop Finch's wish list.
                            “I never wanted to be a big star,” Finch once observed: “I usually do one film a year, so I always have enough money to enjoy myself and keep myself out of the public eye. It’s a very pleasant life, not one of great ambition.”

                            Comment


                            • Yo.

                              Originally posted by Mister.Weirdo View Post
                              http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/0...n_2478792.html

                              TOKYO Nagisa Oshima, a Japanese director internationally acclaimed for his films "Empire of Passion" and "In the Realm of the Senses," has died of pneumonia. He was 80.




                              Originally posted by Mister.Weirdo View Post
                              http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Hollywo...-finch-dead-71

                              Actor Jon Finch, known to movie goers for his performances in films like "Frenzy" and "The Tragedy of Macbeth," is dead at the age of 71. His body was discovered in his home in Hastings "after friends and family became concerned for his welfare," according to The Telegraph.





                              Tazer


                              Originally posted by Andrew NDB
                              Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

                              Comment


                              • http://www.people.com/people/article...ss-fullcontent

                                Conrad Bain, the easygoing TV star who played the Park Avenue father on the 1978-85 sitcom Diff'rent Strokes, died in his hometown of Livermore, Calif., on Monday. He was 89.

                                His daughter, Jennifer Bain, confirmed his death to PEOPLE, and said her father died of natural causes.

                                "He'd been unconscious for a couple of days, but he was comfortable and it was very peaceful," she said of her dad, who also played the argumentative neighbor on the 1972-78 hit show Maude. "I was able to be with him very close to the end [and] able to put my ear to his heart and sing him songs."

                                A highly professional actor who gained early experience at Ontario's Stratford Shakespeare Festival in his native Canada and studied at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York, Bain nonetheless was often overshadowed by his costars.


                                From left: Todd Bridges, Conrad Bain and Gary Coleman, on Diff'rent Strokes
                                GETTY
                                On Diff'rent Strokes, as successful businessman Phillip Drummond, the scene-stealers were Todd Bridges and, especially, Gary Coleman, who played his adoptive sons. On Maude, they were Beatrice Arthur, the star of the show, and Rue McClanahan, who played Lillian, the wife of Bain's character, Dr. Arthur Harmon.

                                "My father really was a lot like his character in Diff'rent Strokes," said his daughter. "He had that warmth and stability. He also was a very intellectual person."

                                She added, "Dad was proud of his work on that show. And the problems the kids had in their lives later affected him. He felt terrible about it." (Bridges struggled with substance-abuse problems, while Coleman, who had personal and financial problems, died in 2010, at the age of 42.)

                                "Dad had a kind heart," said Jennifer Bain. "He was an open-hearted man."

                                Besides his daughter, Bain is survived by a twin brother, Bonar Bain, and three sons. Their mother, Bain's wife Monica, died in 2009.

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