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Mister.Weirdo's Memorial Thread For Those Who Will NOT Be Down For Breakfast

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  • Yo.

    http://tv.yahoo.com/news/-diff-rent-...181613933.html

    'Diff'rent Strokes' star Conrad Bain dead at 89

    its funny to think that he outlasted 2 of the kids, and NOT the 1 who was really screwed up & most thought would die 1st......




    Tazer


    Originally posted by Andrew NDB
    Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Tazer View Post
      Yo.

      http://tv.yahoo.com/news/-diff-rent-...181613933.html



      its funny to think that he outlasted 2 of the kids, and NOT the 1 who was really screwed up & most thought would die 1st......




      Tazer
      I already posted this minutes before you did.

      But who cares, something like this always happens.

      Comment


      • Yo.

        yea, but *mine* had pics!

        *takes the Capt. Morgan -stance*




        Tazer


        Originally posted by Andrew NDB
        Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

        Comment


        • Yo.

          http://www.tmz.com/2013/01/17/dear-a...line-phillips/


          'Dear Abby' Creator
          Pauline Phillips
          Dead at 94





          Tazer


          Originally posted by Andrew NDB
          Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

          Comment


          • http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...rt-chew-413709

            Robert F. Chew, best known for playing Joseph "Proposition Joe" Stewart on HBO's The Wire, died in his sleep of apparent heart failure at his Baltimore home, his sister Clarice told the Baltimore Sun. He was 52.

            Chew, who died Thursday, appeared in all five seasons (2004-08) of David Simon's acclaimed drama series. His character, based in part on a real-life Baltimore resident, was a drug kingpin who earned his nickname from his trademark phrase "I've got a proposition for you."

            "The Wire cast was an embarrassment of riches, and it was easy, I think, for outsiders to overlook some of those who were so essential as supporting players," Simon told the Sun in an email Friday. "Robert's depiction of Proposition Joe was so fixed and complete -- from the very earliest scenes -- that the writers took for granted that anything we sent him would be finely executed.”

            Jamie Hector, who played Marlo Stanfield on The Wire, also remembered his former co-star on Twitter.

            "I didn't want to believe this #RIP Robert F Chew, Prop Joe will always be remembered Robert Chew will always be loved and missed!" he wrote.

            Chew got his start as an actor in 1997 with a multi-episode arc on Homicide: Life on the Street, which Simon produced. He then went on to work with Simon again on the 2000 HBO miniseries The Corner.

            His brief resume also includes the 2004 HBO movie Something the Lord Made and a role opposite Mary-Louise Parker and James Woods in the upcoming film Jamesy Boy, based on the true story of a teen street-gang member who ends up in maximum-security prison, where he turns his life around.

            Chew, a Baltimore native who sang in the Morgan State University choir, also taught and mentored children and young adults in acting at Baltimore's Arena Players and helped 22 of his students land roles in The Wire.

            Services will be held Thursday in Baltimore.

            Comment


            • Yo.






              Tazer


              Originally posted by Andrew NDB
              Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

              Comment


              • http://www.cnn.com/2013/01/19/sport/...bit/?hpt=hp_t2

                He was simply "The Man."

                Stanley Frank Musial made a name for himself as one of baseball's best hitters of all time on the field, as well as one of its greatest, most dignified ambassadors off it.

                And now "Stan the Man" is gone. Musial died at his Ladue, Missouri, home surrounded by family, the Cardinals said in a statement. According to a post on his Twitter page, which is maintained by his grandson Brian Musial Schwarze, Musial died at 5:45 p.m. (6:45 p.m. ET) Saturday of natural causes.

                He was 92.

                "We have lost the most beloved member of the Cardinals family," said William DeWitt Jr., the club's chairman. "Stan Musial was the greatest player in Cardinals history and one of the best players in the history of baseball."

                The Pennsylvania-born Musial transitioned from a lackluster pitcher to a stellar slugging outfielder, according to his biography on the National Baseball Hall of Fame's website.
                The left-hander had a batting average above .300 17 times during his 22-year career -- all played with St. Louis -- and earned three National League Most Valuable Player awards as well as three World Series titles. The only blip came in 1945, in the thick of World War II, when he left baseball to join the U.S. Navy.

                Stan Musial waves to fans during the 2012 National League Championship Series.
                After the 1963 season, Musial retired with a .331 career batting average and as the National League's career leader in RBI, games played, runs scored, hits and doubles. He has since been surpassed in some of those categories, but he still ranks fourth in baseball history in total hits, behind only Pete Rose, Ty Cobb and Hank Aaron.

                He also stood out for his grace and sportsmanship -- having never been ejected once by an umpire. In his retirement ceremony, then-Major League Commissioner Ford Frick referred to Musial as "baseball's perfect warrior, baseball's perfect knight."

                In 1969, Musial was elected on his first try into the Hall of Fame, calling it "the greatest honor of the many that have been bestowed upon me."

                During and after his playing career, Musial developed a special relationship with the St. Louis fan base, who knew him simply as "Stan the Man."

                A bronze statue of him stands outside Busch Stadium, which is located in Musial Plaza along Stan Musial Drive.

                He continued with the organization for more than 25 years after his playing days ended, serving as vice president and general manager.

                And Musial was active in the community, contributing to causes such as the USO, the Senior Olympics, the Boy Scouts and Covenant House.

                "I have no hesitation to say that St. Louis is a great place in which to live and work," he said in his Hall of Fame induction speech. "We love St. Louis."

                His fans returned the favor, revering him for his play as well as his character and commitment to the area.

                "Cardinal Nation will never be the same. Rest in peace Stan 'The Man' Musial, the best Cardinal there ever was," wrote one woman, by the name of Elise, on Twitter.
                Musial also stood tall outside eastern Missouri. He served between 1964 and 1967 as chairman of the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.

                In 2011, President Barack Obama bestowed upon him the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor.

                "Stan matched his hustle with humility," Obama said then. "Stan remains, to this day, an icon, untarnished; a beloved pillar of the community; a gentleman you'd want your kids to emulate."

                Lillian, Musial's wife of 71 years, died last May -- a longlasting marriage that some people, online, called as admirable as anything that happened on the diamond.

                Stan Musial's passing spurred an outpouring of condolences and praise. Commissioner Bud Selig described him as "a Hall of Famer in every sense" and "a true gentleman," former pitcher Curt Schilling called his life "a clinic in respect, integrity and honor," and current Cardinal Matt Holliday said it was "an honor to the same uniform."

                The messages from fans were no less heartfelt.

                Wrote Jason Lukehart, on Twitter: "In a week that's shown the dangers deifying athletes, Stan Musial's death reminds me that once in a great while, there's a man worthy of it."

                Comment


                • Yo.






                  Tazer


                  Originally posted by Andrew NDB
                  Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

                  Comment


                  • http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/20...el-winner-dead

                    Michael Winner, bon viveur, restaurant critic and arguably one of the best known British film-makers of the 20th century has died at the age of 77. "A light has gone out of my life," his wife Geraldine Lynton-Edwards said. "Michael was a wonderful man, brilliant, funny and generous."

                    Winner had been in ill health for a number of years and almost died after contracting a bacterial infection while holidaying on Barbados in January 2007.

                    Born to a wealthy family in north London, Winner cut his teeth at the BBC before making his debut as a writer-director with the 1960 crime thriller Shoot to Kill. His freewheeling 1964 sex comedy The System established him as a key chronicler of swinging 60s London and gave rise to a fruitful collaboration with the hell-raising actor Oliver Reed. Winner went on to work with Reed again on The Jokers, I'll Never Forget What's'isname and the 1968 wartime saga Hannibal Brooks.

                    Yet Winner's greatest success came in the US, when he took the reins of the 1974 vigilante drama Death Wish from original director Sidney Lumet. Death Wish, starring Charles Bronson as a mild-mannered architect turned gun-toting angel of vengeance, bloomed into one of the year's biggest box-office hits and went on to spawn two sequels. Winner's other American films include Lawman, The Mechanic, The Big Sleep and Scorpio. He also worked with a wild-eyed Marlon Brando on The Nightcomers, an overheated prequel to the Henry James story The Turn of the Screw.

                    During his heyday, Winner took pride in making violent, simple, populist pictures that irked the critics and appeared to relish his role as a man who called the shots. "A team effort is a lot of people doing what I say," he once remarked. His career waned in the 90s and he bowed out with the 1999 hitman caper Parting Shots, a British film that reunited him with his old friend Oliver Reed. In later life he found a fresh lease of life as an outspoken restaurant critic for the Sunday Times. His insurance commercials for British television also established a catchphrase – "Calm down, dear" – that was later adopted by David Cameron.

                    Winner was reportedly offered an OBE in 2006 but turned it down with a lordly flourish. "An OBE is what you get if you clean the toilets well at King's Cross station," he said.

                    Comment


                    • Yo.






                      Tazer


                      Originally posted by Andrew NDB
                      Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

                      Comment


                      • He's been doing that a lot lately and realizes it and deletes the post.

                        Comment


                        • Yo.

                          I think being the "progenitor" of 2 threads on the same page is taking it toll on the poor guy.........















































                          Tazer


                          Originally posted by Andrew NDB
                          Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

                          Comment


                          • Yo.

                            http://www.philly.com/philly/news/br..._has_died.html

                            Sally Starr, cowgirl queen of the TV screen, has died




                            Tazer


                            Originally posted by Andrew NDB
                            Geoff Johns should have a 10 mile restraining order from comic books, let alone films.

                            Comment


                            • Stanley Karnow, famed Vietnam reporter and Pulitzer Prize-winning historian, dies at 87


                              http://news.yahoo.com/karnow-vietnam...140506507.html

                              Comment


                              • http://www.thewrap.com/movies/articl...ses-away-75041

                                Lloyd Phillips, an Academy Award-winning producer, died in Los Angeles on Jan. 25 after suffering a heart attack, his representative said. He was 63.

                                In 32 years in the movie business, Phillips produced films including “Inglourious Basterds,” “The Legend of Zorro" and “Twelve Monkeys," as well as Zach Snyder's upcoming "Superman" reboot, "Man of Steel."

                                “Lloyd was quite talented in all aspects of filmmaking, which is why he had success as a creative producer and as a physical line producer,” said Charles Roven, another "Man of Steel" producer who has made three films with Phillips. “Our working relationship spanned over 20 years, as did our wonderful, action-packed, sometimes-turbulent-but-never-dull friendship.”

                                Phillips was born in South Africa, but raised in New Zealand. He became the latter country’s first Oscar winner after being awarded a statue for his 1981 short film, “The Dollar Bottom.”

                                Angelina Jolie, who worked with Phillips on 2010's "The Tourist" and 2003's "Beyond Borders," called the deceased producer "a true original, loved by anyone who knew him well.”

                                “He had a kind heart and a wonderful sense of adventure," Jolie said. "His death is a terrible shock and a tremendous loss. He was so full of life that it is impossible to believe he is gone.”

                                Phillips is survived by his wife and fellow film producer, Beau St. Clair, and his sister, Avril
                                Tantrum, who resides in New Zealand.

                                Comment

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