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  • LEGACIES

    The DC Universe is about legacies. The Golden Age. The Silver Age. The Bronze Age. Heroes passing on mantles to their protégés. Teachers and students. Fathers and sons, mothers and daughters. In the DCU, the sense of family and history is part of the very fiber of the universe.

    One of my earliest comic book memories as a kid was when my dad took me to the comic shop for the first time and bought me a copy of THE GREATEST FLASH STORIES EVER TOLD. I remember huddling in my room (you’d think I’d be outside, enjoying the Miami sun – but that’s neither here nor there) with the bright yellow book, featuring three generations of speedsters hurtling toward me, and being drawn into a world of lightning speed, chemicals and science, secret gorilla nations, colorful villains who wielded mirrors and boomerangs and a stand-up guy named Barry Allen, who loved his wife Iris and his nephew Wally. Barry was also the Flash, the Fastest Man Alive. He didn’t have the same funny hat as the guy before him, nor was he as grim as the Batman or as strong as Superman, but something about him stuck. He was someone to look up to.

    And then there was Wally – a kid relatively my age who had amazing powers and was learning from his idol. Reading Cary Bates’ heartbreaking “Death of the Flash” synopsis toward the end of the collection was both shocking and uplifting – Barry died saving the universe, but his sidekick took over. The student became the teacher.

    This is what the DCU is built on – heroes trying to live up to the legacies their predecessors have created, and in the process, creating new ones of their own. Superman. Batman. Wonder Woman. Green Lantern. The Flash. The Justice Society. The Justice League. The Legion of Super-Heroes. Hawkman. The Atom. I could go on, but you get what I’m saying here.

    And, as we enter the next decade of the 21st century, the DCU is going to take a moment to celebrate its rich and legendary history.
    LEGACIES #1 COVER by Andy Kubert


    First up is LEGACIES, a 7-part mini-series kicking off in May from writer Len Wein and an all-star cast of artists. Each issue will spotlight a different era from the history of the DCU in two stories, with each issue moving us closer to the present. Who’s up first artistically, tackling the birth of the DCU and the beginnings of the mystery men and the Golden Age? None other than Andy Kubert and his father Joe Kubert, who’ve built their very own comic book legacy. It’s only fitting, right? I would think so. Plus, you get a story illustrated by none other than J.G. Jones, as each issue will feature backups with art by some of the biggest names in the industry. Here’s a clue as to Len’s perspective on the series, from his first interview:

    “Legacies is the history of the DCU as told from the point of view of the man on the street. It starts at the dawn of the Golden Age and right now it runs right up to the moments before Countdown to Infinite Crisis begins.”

    “Being asked to work on these historic and iconic characters is an honor,” said Andy Kubert. “Being asked to work with the creators involved — that I grew up reading…and got RAISED by — is not only an honor, but awe inspiring.”






    But there’s more. Dan DiDio’s teased this here and there, but we can now officially confirm that in tandem with LEGACIES, we’ll also be publishing new editions of THE HISTORY OF THE DC UNIVERSE and an all-new WHO’S WHO 12-issue series, profiling some of the best and lesser-known characters populating the DC Universe.

    And while the DCU in 2010 will be very much about pushing our most beloved characters into new worlds and to face new challenges, there’s a lot to be said about tipping your hat to the past, and the legacy of those that came before.



    DAN DIDIO talks "LEGACIES"

    DC Executive Editor Dan DiDio shared the early details exclusively with CBR.

    "We get asked a lot about the history of the DC Universe," DiDio said. "It's one of the things that's always been a topic of 'With so many changes and revisions and events...when are you going to tell the definitive history of the DC Universe?' I had bought those 'History of the DC Universe' books that came out after 'Crisis On Infinite Earths,' and that was more of a textbook. It was more of a listing. I've never been big on timelines, because as soon as you put a timeline down, you have to revise it because our characters don't age at the same speed as actual time. If they did, I'd have these 80-year-old guys in these baggy suits that would look really ridiculous.

    "Because of all that, what we need to do, and what we're trying to do, is build this 'Legacies' book. 'Legacies' is a series that breaks down, over its chapters, the five generations of the DCU. They're very concise generations, each with a beginning and end, and what you see is the various incarnations of our characters evolve, change and grow as the generations pass on. In that way, we build what might be called a timeline, not in a calendar way, but told through story as the world changes around them. We've got a lot of touchstones of events and storylines throughout the DCU that we'll hit."

    DiDio explained that while the series would touch upon all the marquee superheroes expected in a universe-spanning DC event, the crux of the story will have a very personal, ground-level feel. "We're seeing the Flashes change. We see the Green Lanterns change. And we see how the world evolves around them by seeing it through the point of view of two characters and how their lives change and how their families' lives change in watching the DC Universe grow. It has a bit of a 'Marvels' feel, which I still think is a wonderful book, and I think it's wonderful to tell the history of the DC Universe in this manner. We tell stories, and it makes more sense to tell this info in a story than in text."

    The opening story takes place during comics' Golden Age with an appearance by DC's original masked crime-fighter, the Crimson Avenger. "For the most part, people look at the Crimson Avenger as the first costumed here, so it only makes sense for him to be in there. The interesting thing about the first generation of heroes – and it's one of Len's favorite things, so I'm going to give it away – is that there's change in that first generation alone. We go from the mystery men of Crimson Avenger, the Atom and the Sandman who are introduced in the first issue, to the second issue [where] you see the first time characters have actually changed costumes. You see the advent of the superhero from men in suits and jackets and cloaks to something more along the lines of the spandex. You see the birth of the superhero through the characters' evolutions, which is exciting."

    Fans can expect a mix of modern production values and classic cartooning as the the Kuberts – son on pencils, father on inks – revisit the earliest days of comics. "The very arc deals with the early days of the mystery men, and that's drawn by Andy Kubert and Joe Kubert to show you the amount of value and weight we're putting into this series," the Executive Editor said, noting that each "generation" of "Legacies" will be drawn by a specific art team. "It was fun to find the teams that best represented those particular moments in time...Andy's taken a lot of the style that he built with 'Whatever Happened To The Caped Crusader?' and brought it to this book. But he was excited and intimidated to be working with his father. And the best part of his father being involved is that Joe keeps asking for more pages. So now I don't have to do that job. Let dad do it!"

    And while DiDio remained tight-lipped about who would draw the series beyond that point, he did reveal that each new arc would also include additional story material to flesh out the full extent of the legacies at DC. "In each story, there's a lead story and a backup story focusing on interesting aspects of the DCU that didn't exactly fit the main story, but were worth touching upon."

    Overall, the expectation the publisher has for the series ties in to the current state of DiDio's plans for the DCU beyond the idea of playing in the same sandbox. "It's one of the things I've wanted to do ever since I got here, and it never seemed right. But now it seems right. One of the things we're looking at, post-'Blackest Night,' is a very locked down sense of the rules and sensibilities and interpretations of our characters, and we don't plan to be reworking them as sporadically as we've done in the past."
    W.West
    Moderator
    Last edited by W.West; 12-10-2009, 09:38 PM.

  • #2
    is this DC's version of The Marvel's Project?

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    • #3
      seems kinda cool, might have to check it out.

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      • #4
        This sounds like something I would either love or hate, depending on how it is handled. Definitely interesting.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Mister Ed View Post
          This sounds like something I would either love or hate, depending on how it is handled. Definitely interesting.
          Well I'm down for the first issue, no way I can pass up the Kuberts AND JG Jones. But the only thing I'm cautious about is Len's writing. As we all saw with Marv Wolfman, some creators just don't have it anymore.

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          • #6
            Sounds cool, but I would pick a different writer than Len Wein

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            • #7
              I think this is worth a look.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by mateus View Post
                is this DC's version of The Marvel's Project?

                Yep. Hopefully it will be better.

                I'll buy it. Skim through each issue, and, depending on the era, buy the book.

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                • #9
                  Does Anyone think that Legacies will touch on events like COIE, Invasion, Final Night Etc?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by fearless2814.1 View Post
                    Yep. Hopefully it will be better.

                    I'll buy it. Skim through each issue, and, depending on the era, buy the book.
                    better than the Marvel's Project? thats a bold statement if i may say so. but then again maybe im the only one really looking forward to MP releases.

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                    • #11
                      I read the first two issues. It bored me.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by fearless2814.1 View Post
                        I read the first two issues. It bored me.
                        to each his own i guess.

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                        • #13
                          I'll wait for the trade, and even then, I might skip it.
                          The Best Comic Site Ever!!!

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                          • #14
                            So this chronicles the DCU from the Golden Age all the way to Infinite Crisis?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by FrEaKjOkErXXX View Post
                              So this chronicles the DCU from the Golden Age all the way to Infinite Crisis?
                              Yeah, Through the eyes of Normal people.

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