The Green Lantern Corps Message Board

Go Back   The Green Lantern Corps Message Board > Green Lanternverse > Other Comics
FLASHCHAT

Miscellaneous GL Comics
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-07-2015, 02:42 AM   #1
Hypo
Lil' Leaguer
 
Hypo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Earth-42
Posts: 22,655
Default Grant Morrison Named EIC of Heavy Metal

Quote:
Heavy Metal has always been a little bit dirty. Next year, it’ll get positively Filthy.

That’s because the venerable publishing brand—synonymous with adult-skewing sci-fi, fantasy, and horror comics—has hired superstar comic book scribe Grant Morrison (The Filth, The Invisibles, Doom Patrol) to be its new editor-in-chief. For a sense of the kind of eye-popping, eye-poking spunk Heavy Metal hopes Morrison will bring to its pages, check out this first look at the cover of his first issue, on sale in February.

Heavy Metal began life in 1977 as the U.S. analog to the French adult comics magazine Metal Hurlant, but it quickly developed its own identity. During its heyday in the ’70s and ’80s, it published strips and art by comic luminaries like Jean Giraud (aka Moebius), H.R. Giger, Bernie Wrightson, Richard Corben, Howard Chaykin, Walter Simonson, and Kevin Eastman. The content was sophisticated and spectacular, edgy and explicit. Or just sexy. Nudity abounded. But there were also features, short prose fiction, and interviews with filmmakers like Federico Fellini and Roger Corman. It was Playboy for geeks. It’s perhaps best known in the broader culture for the 1981 film, an R-rated animated anthology, and its Sammy Hagar theme song. Call it HEAVY METAL!

Heavy Metal’s profile has waxed and waned since the late ’80s. Since 1991, Kevin Eastman, co-creator of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, has served as its chief steward and acolyte. Hopes for a pop resurgence were stoked in 2011 when filmmaker Robert Rodriguez (Sin City) announced that he was developing a new anthology flick, but nothing came of it. In 2014, Eastman sold Heavy Metal to Jeff Krelitz, a film and TV producer, and David Boxenbaum, a former music industry exec. (Eastman remains publisher.) Now they’re pursuing an ambitious plan to energize and maximize the Heavy Metal brand. Recruiting Morrison to be the EIC of the magazine is major step in that direction. Co-CEO Krelitz—who grew up reading Heavy Metal and didn’t come to superhero comics until he discovered Morrison’s breakthrough, groundbreaking American work in the ’80s—believes the Scottish scribe is a perfect fit.

“The first D.C. Comics book I ever picked up was Arkham Asylum. I thought ‘Holy shit! Batman just went Heavy Metal!’” says Krelitz, referring to Morrison’s 1989 graphic novel with Dave McKean (full title: Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serous Earth), a heady, macabre, and… well, serious-minded psychological thriller yarn that sent the dark knight into Gotham’s hellacious loony bin to battle his worst enemies and personal demons. “From the standpoint of what he does and how he tells a story—edgy, provocative, avant-garde—that’s us. And why not? It just makes sense.”
Quote:
Eastman agrees, citing the diversity of Morrison’s imagination and interest. Morrison’s prodigious, overwhelming oeuvre runs the gamut from Animal Man to Superman, Justice League of America to X-Men, from sincere superhero myth-making to irreverent superhero deconstruction. His catalog of original, creator-owned work—The Invisibles, The Filth, and recent titles like Happy! and Annihilator—is more on point with Heavy Metal’s subversive, explicit, politically charged, counter-culture attitude. “I gave it thumbs up, thumbs up, thumbs up, thumbs up,” says Eastman. “He is going to blow some minds and expand some others.”

“We’re trying to bring back some of that ’70s punk energy of Heavy Metal, but update it and make it new again,” says Morrison, 55, adding that his first comics work, in the Scottish comics mag Near Myths, was directly inspired by Heavy Metal. “One of the things I like to do in my job is revamp properties and really get into the aesthetic of something, dig into the roots of what makes it work, then tinker with the engine and play around with it. So for me, it’s an aesthetic thing first and foremost. The idea of immersing myself in the aesthetic of Heavy Metal is exciting. It’s going to change the clothes I wear, the way I create; it’s like a performance for me. Beyond that, just the idea of being able to curate stories, decide the direction of the magazine, and work with great talent and develop new talent is an exciting opportunity.”

Morrison plans to write comic strips and prose material for the bimonthly magazine, too. He says he’s just beginning to reach out to talent in hopes of recruiting them. On his radar: Past collaborators Chris Burnham (Nameless) and Frazer Irving (Annihilator). He says Heavy Metal will be the primary focus of his comics work for at least a year or two. “I want to give my attention over to making something that’s unique and provocative, a bit more scary for people and challenging,” he says.

Another comic legend will be making his Heavy Metal debut before Morrison’s first issue hits in 2016: the late artist Jack Kirby, co-creator of Fantastic Four, The Hulk, Captain America, and scores of other famous characters, and whose signature style has influenced generations of storytellers. In the late ’70s, Kirby created concept art for an aborted movie adaptation of Roger Zelazny’s classic 1967 sci-fi novel, Lord of Light. Those who know the real-life backstory of the Oscar-winning film Argo will know that Kirby’s Lord of Light work was used by the CIA as part of an operation in which an agent posed as a movie producer to rescue a group of American diplomats from Tehran following the Iranian Revolution. Heavy Metal will be publishing Kirby’s work, in color, for the first time this August, with permission from Barry Gellar, the writer and producer of the Lord of Light film. The publisher will also be selling a series of Kirby/Lord of Light prints at San Diego’s Comic-Con this summer.

While Morrison works reinvigorate Heavy Metal magazine, Krelitz and Boxenbaum are looking to build up Heavy Metal in other media. There’s now a Heavy Metal record label with BMG. There are television shows in various stages of development. And Krelitz is mapping out a bold plan for a shared movie universe, comprised of different Heavy Metal-branded franchises, analogous to the Marvel Studios and DC Entertainment philosophy. Where Marvel and DC make PG and PG-13 films, Heavy Metal will make PG-13 and R-rated films. The goal is to develop live action movies, in the vein of Avatar, not animated films. Says Krelitz: “It’ll be a series of films leading into a Heavy Metal movie, with another series of films leading into a another Heavy Metal movie.”
__________________
Hypo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2015, 12:58 PM   #2
Space Cop
The Dandy
 
Space Cop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: The Third State
Posts: 28,346
Blog Entries: 2
Default

I didn't realize HM was still going. I never see it on any shelves.
__________________
Space Cop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2015, 03:38 PM   #3
plastroncafe
Alpha-Lantern
 
plastroncafe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Boston
Posts: 2,620
Default

Nice!
Man, the lines around that booth this weekend in San Diego are going to be NUTS!
__________________
plastroncafe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2015, 03:10 PM   #4
Hypo
Lil' Leaguer
 
Hypo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Earth-42
Posts: 22,655
Default

SDCC ’15: Grant Morrison’s Heavy Metal Will Be Psychedelic And Sexy – Talking With The New EIC
Quote:
Cameron Hatheway: You’re one of the most creative, most widely recognized writers in comics, hands-down. What made you decide to delete all that and take the reins of Editor-in-Chief at one of the most iconic comics magazines?

Grant Morrison: Well the thing is I don’t have to delete anything, because I’m still doing all the same things anyway, it’s just another thing I’m piling on top of my schedule. I came here because I’m friends with Jeff [Krelitz], and we’ve been friends for a couple of years and Jeff said, “You should do something for the magazine, we should get you to do something,” then suddenly, “Do you want to edit this?” And it seemed like such a weird left-field thing that I had to say “Yes,” because I like taking on challenges, and doing things I haven’t done. Once you’ve been around a long time you’ve kind of done it all, and it just seemed like real fun. And I was never a great fan of Heavy Metal—When I was a kid the first magazine that started out was Near Myths, and that was my professional job, and they were a kind of Scottish, home-grown attempt to do an adult magazine in the vein of Heavy Metal, so at the time as a little punk I was viewing it as competition, even though it was no competition against Moebius and those guys! But I got excited about this idea of going back to the stuff that inspired me in the very first place, and contemporize that and play with it. And the way that I do revamps with Superman and Batman and immerse myself in it all, I thought, “I should do this with Heavy Metal and see what we can make.”

CH: Who are some of the creators or stories that left a major impression on you when you first started reading it?

GM: It was mostly the artwork. I loved the French guys that did the artwork but I didn’t like the stories so much—I thought they kind of didn’t reach the point, I was much more of a fan of American comics and the way they told stories, but in my head all fused together were the Warren stuff with Vampirella, and Marvel with the Savage Sword of Conan. The more you graduated from, when you stopped reading the Marvel cosmic books like Warlock and Dr. Strange, you kind of moved up to these sexy sci-fi, girls-with-tits comics, because it made me feel really kind of grown up and naughty. So it was that, I loved the artwork, but I wasn’t a fan of the stories. Not until Richard Corben, when Heavy Metal

started running Corben’s stuff and I really got into that. But it was mostly for the art, honestly, that’s what I liked about it, and there was always the sense that, “Yeah, we could do that better if they just let us write the stuff.”

CH: Some of your critics say you need an editor, and yet, now you’re editor in chief. Did you talk to any ex-editor-in-chiefs like Mark Waid and get advice on how to approach things, or are you planning on just going with your gut and going into it guns blazing?

GM: I kind of have an idea of what I’m looking for, and also I don’t have to do the hard craft, I just get the easy job; I get to select the material and determine the tone of the magazine. I’ve got a lot of friends in editorial, but they do it as a serious job, that’s their job. For me this is more of a selection job and kind of guiding the aesthetic. I feel that I’m capable of handling it. And I always do have an editor, everyone says, “You need an editor!” I’ve always got an editor, but nobody edits me! [Laughter]

CH: What do you plan on bringing to the magazine with your ideas and connections? Any word from Chris Burnham or Frazer Irving yet on if they’ll come play in the sandbox with you?

GM: Yeah Burnham wants to do it, Ryan Hughes wants to do a new take, things like that. So people are already getting in touch with me, but right now it’s at the very start of the process so I’ve just started reaching out. I’ve also got a lot of fans in the music industry, and I think so many of them are into comics that it would be great to bring them and see. Gerard Way, we know Trent Reznor, things like that. It was kind of, “Who could we bring in to add a weird dimension to this, but who also comes from that world?” It’s a bit more industrial, techy, stuff.

CH: Keeping it a bit more punk rock.

GM: Yeah! There’s a bunch of people—Steve Aylett does these weird comics, I don’t know if you’ve ever seen the stuff that Steve does, but he’s an amazing novelist from Britain who’s like an underground, young guy who does amazing stuff. People like that, and Michael Kupperman from Thrizzle has got in touch and said, “Yeah I’d like to do something for Heavy Metal,” I’d love to have Michael Kupperman in there. It’s a broad span, but basically its psychedelic, that’s where I want to take it. To also make it more sexy, but kind of grow the sexuality, because for a long time Heavy Metal’s traded in that kind of Mötley Crüe video, which was cool in the day, but we need to broaden it. Because kids don’t need to read Heavy Metal to see airbrushed tits these days, they’ve got the internet. They can see anything they want! So I think we have to broaden the focus of that and kind of deal with that in a way. But that’s going to be something psychedelic, sex, science fiction, and from that, anything goes.

CH: Your name on the cover, along with that great illustration by Brain Ewing alone will get new readers flocking to stores to pick it up. What’s going to keep them coming back for more?

GM: I wanted to be like a place you go, kind of like a club. It was always like that when we were doing The Invisibles and the latest pages were such a big deal that made a very strong connection with the readership. And especially now in the age of the internet, when I was doing the Multiversity stuff, it’s all about the changed relationship between the creator and the audience, because it’s much tighter. People can comment immediately, it’s almost like this live performance thing. And people are kind of adapting to the comments, you see people apologizing immediately if they get something wrong and fixing it in the next one. I’m kind of fascinated about that breakdown about it, so I want Heavy Metal to be very reflective of that, in the sense that this is your place to come, we’re all into the same stuff, let’s build a club. I’ll get the hammer, you get the nails, let’s build this and put on a show!

CH: Since you start next year, will you be spending the rest of this year writing and wrapping-up current storylines and series, or will you still be writing other comics while simultaneously editing the magazine?

GM: I’m still doing a bunch of stuff. I’ve got a couple of DC things that have been announced, I’m doing this Santa Klaus thing at BOOM!, I’m finishing up Nameless at Image, and I’ve got another couple of projects coming soon. I’m still doing it. It’s amazing the amount of time that was freed-up once I stopped doing the DC monthly comics, because those were such an intense drain of time. It just kind of opened things up, which is why you see me spilling into every area. But I haven’t left DC behind, I’m not really stopping anything to do this. It’s just going to be a part of this new energy I’m feeling right now.
__________________
Hypo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2016, 09:20 PM   #5
Hypo
Lil' Leaguer
 
Hypo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Earth-42
Posts: 22,655
Default

Heavy Metal Reloaded: Your exclusive first look at Grant Morrison's debut issue
__________________
Hypo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2016, 11:52 PM   #6
Agent Purple
The Illustrated Man
 
Agent Purple's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Isengard
Posts: 14,957
Blog Entries: 3
Default

I'll have to find a copy of that.
__________________
Villain Draft 3: Fourth Place Winner

September 11, 2001; January 6, 2021; February 13, 2021
Agent Purple is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 02:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.